Brantford - Click here for Google Map

Situated on the picturesque Grand River, the city of Brantford is located in the heart of Southern Ontario, with direct access to Hwy. 403 and close proximity to other major highways, rail lines and three major Canadian ports of entry (Windsor, Toronto and Niagara Falls). For visitors Brantford is an easy-to-find destination for day trips and weekend getaways.

Brantford is known as the Telephone City. Inventor Alexander Graham Bell brought fame to Brantford when he invented the telephone here on July 26th, 1874, and made the first-ever long distance call on August 10th, 1876. The Homestead, which provided the stage for this invention, is a National Historic Site. It has been restored to appear as it was in Bell’s day, and has welcomed visitors from around the world - including Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II- since 1910.

Proud to be the hometown of “the Great One,” Wayne Gretzky, Brantford is a city where amateur and minor sports are an integral part of community life. Wayne’s father, Walter Gretzky, still lives here in the city he's always called home.

Brantford boasts over 40 kilometres of natural trails, including a four-season stretch of the Trans Canada Trail. This network of beautifully maintained trails links us to the cities of Cambridge and Hamilton, and provides a great place for hikers, bikers and nature enthusiasts. Also a city known for gorgeous gardens and lush park settings, Brantford is a proud winner of the ‘Best Bloomin’ City Award,’ and is committed to keeping the city in full bloom from spring through fall.

The City of Brantford is host to some of the longest-running festivals in Canada. Visit us each summer and experience the International Villages Festival, a local celebration of various countries around the world, and a Brantford tradition for over 30 years.

www.brantford.ca

Autumn is a Prime Time to Tend Lawns and Gardens

more articles to read Autumn is gardening season. That statement may not seem right to those who think of the spring as the peak time to care for lawns and gardens. However, autumn is an ideal time to get into the garden and ensure that flowers, trees and garden beds will over-winter successfully.

A number of things make autumn a prime gardening season. The cooler days of fall enable gardeners to spend ample time outdoors without the threat of blazing heat. In addition, soil harbors a lot of residual warmth in autumn. Also, the colder temperatures haven't yet arrived in autumn, nor have the leaves completely fallen, making fall a prime time to assess what's already in the landscape, what needs pruning back and where to address planting for next year.

Gardening enthusiasts can focus their attention on these areas this fall.
· Pamper perennials. As annuals and perennials start to fall back, mark the spots where perennials are located so they can be easily identified later on. This way, when planning spots for spring bulbs or other spring layouts for next year, perennials won't be overlooked or covered over.
· Prune shrubs. Look at shrubs and trees and cut out dead or diseased wood.
· Clean up borders. Weed and tidy up borders and lawn edging.
· Install pavers or rock wall. Embrace the cooler temperatures to work on labor-intensive projects, such as putting in a garden bed, retaining wall or walkway.
· Remove spent summer veggies. Take out vegetable garden plants that have already bloomed and borne fruit. Tidy up vegetable gardens and start to sow cooler weather plants, such as onions, garlic, beans, and sweet peas.
· Rake and compost. Rake the leaves and gather grass clippings to add to the compost pile.
· Plant spring bulbs. Get tulips and other spring bulbs ready for planting so they'll burst with color next year.
· Dig up herbs. Relocate herbs like parsley or basil to indoor gardens. Otherwise, strip all leaves and freeze for storage during winter.
· Consider mums. Chrysanthemum plants are perennials. While they look beautiful in pots, if planted, maintained and winterized, they can bloom every fall.
· Fertilize the lawn. Fertilizing in autumn helps ensure grass will stay healthy throughout the winter.
· Add mulch and compost to the garden. Replenish spent soil with mulch and compost so garden beds will be revitalized for spring planting.
· Prune hedges. Tidy up hedges, as they won't be growing much more this year.
· Clean and store equipment. Clean, sharpen and oil all equipment, storing lawn and garden tools properly so they are ready for spring and not lying out all winter.

Autumn may not seem like gardening season, but there are plenty of lawn and garden tasks to tend to during this time of year.