The area was first settled and founded in 1869 by George Hunt, who built a small agricultural centre there. In 1870, a post office was built and the area was named Huntsville after Hunt, who became the first postmaster. Huntsville's economic development was stimulated by the engineering of a navigable water route north from Port Sydney to Huntsville which opened in 1877. A railway route from Gravenhurst was built by the Northern and Pacific Junction Railway in 1885, which encouraged development and resulted in Huntsville becoming officially incorporated in 1886.
In the following year, the Muskoka Colonization Road reached this area. The central Ontario community became an important industrial area in the late 19th century and had several saw, planing and shingle mills, as well as a tannery. Today, the many lakes and hills in the area, combined with the town's proximity to both Algonquin Park and Toronto, make Huntsville and the Muskoka region a major tourist destination.


To learn more about Huntsville, go to www.huntsville.ca

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Enjoy more time outdoors (even when it's cold)

read more articlesBeing outside is linked to better moods, more physical activity and less exposure to contaminants (concentrations of some pollutants are often two to five times higher indoors). Also, people who spend time outside may not come into contact with surface germs or develop various illnesses spread as often as those who spend a lot of time indoors.

Cold weather can make the desire to be outside less appealing, but it is important for one's mental and physical well-being to get outside. The following activities might coax people outside for some crisp air.

  • Create snow critters
    Why do snowmen and women get all of the fanfare this time of year? Just about any living or fictional creature can be molded from snow and embellish landscapes. Use food-grade coloring in spray bottles to added even more creative flair to snow designs.
  • Go on a nature hike
    While many plants and animals hibernate in winter, there is still plenty to see. Bring along a sketch book or camera and capture nature in winter. White-washed hills can be beautiful to behold, and many small animals and birds look even more vivid against the white backdrop of snow.
  • Make an obstacle course
    Turn an area of the yard or park into a homemade obstacle course. It's much more difficult, - and a great workout - to try to jump over snow mounds or run down paths when decked out in warm layers. Engage in lighthearted competitions with friends and family members.
  • Build a bonfire
    Children can set off in different directions to gather up firewood to craft a bonfire with adults in a safe location. S'mores taste equally delicious whether it's warm or cold outside, and in winter they can be accompanied by toasty mugs of cocoa.
  • Get sporty
    Sledding, skating, snowshoeing, and ice hockey are just a few of the winter sports that can get the heart pumping and muscles working outside. These activities are entertaining and also great exercise.
When venturing outdoors in winter, dress in layers. This way clothing can be put on or taking off to reduce the likelihood of hypothermia. Just remember you can pick up all of your winter activity gear at Algonquin Outfitters in Huntsville. Check them out at www.algonquinoutfitters.com. HINT: Great gift ideas!